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Their findings strengthened the argument that the strange swings in decay rates were caused by neutrinos from the Sun. The swings seemed to be in synch with the Earth's elliptical orbit, with the decay rates oscillating as the Earth came closer to the Sun (where it would be exposed to more neutrinos) and then moving away. So there was good reason to suspect the Sun, but could it be proved? Enter Peter Sturrock, Stanford professor emeritus of applied physics and an expert on the inner workings of the Sun. While on a visit to the National Solar Observatory in Arizona, Sturrock was handed copies of the scientific journal articles written by the Purdue researchers. Sturrock knew from long experience that the intensity of the barrage of neutrinos the sun continuously sends racing toward Earth varies on a regular basis as the Sun itself revolves and shows a different face, like a slower version of the revolving light on a police car. His advice to Purdue: Look for evidence that the changes in radioactive decay on Earth vary with the rotation of the Sun. "That's what I suggested. And that's what we have done."

4 of 5 in MYSTERIOUS PARTICLES AND SOLAR FLARE:

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