peperonity.net
Welcome, guest. You are not logged in.
Log in or join for free!
 
Stay logged in
Forgot login details?

Login
Stay logged in

For free!
Get started!

Text page


cc.slovenia.peperonity.net

Social security

The government is bound under the Constitution to organise compulsory health, pension, disability and other forms of social insurance, and to ensure that these are managed appropriately. At the same time, the state has a duty to protect the family, motherhood, fatherhood, children and young people, and create the necessary conditions for this.

The government ensures the functioning of social care institutes, creates the conditions for private social work activities, and stimulates and supports the development of self-help, charity work, programmes enabling a more independent life for the disabled, and voluntary work in the area of social security. Social protection is, as one aspect of social security, based on social justice, solidarity, equal accessibility and free choice.

more

Social policy aims at ensuring the social security of every individual. With regard to social protection, the role of the government will gradually shift from ensuring the provision of social services, to regulating and determining the scope of and the conditions for their provision, implementing minimum standards and monitoring effectiveness. One of the long-term goals is the privatisation of state assets used for providing social services, if this enables a significant degree of rationalisation and if the public interest is also served to the appropriate degree.

Social security is a comprehensive model of government measures aimed at ensuring social security, which includes health, occupational, housing, educational, and other aspects, and is as such super-ordinate to the notion of social protection, which is defined through services and financial entitlements to groups and individuals who lack adequate means for subsistence.

Social security is an individual's right to protection from the risks of illness, unemployment, old age, occupational injury, disablement, and maternity, which also includes child support, allowances to family members upon the death of the family breadwinner, and all other rights pursuant to the Social Assistance Act.

Under the Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia, the state is obliged to organise compulsory health, pension, disability and other forms of social insurance, and to see that these are managed appropriately. At the same time, the state has a duty to protect the family, motherhood, fatherhood, children and young people, and create the necessary conditions for this.
The competent body for planning and implementing social protection is the Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Affairs

Family Policy
In the Republic of Slovenia, family policy is based on: the inclusion of the entire population (it addresses all families); observing the plurality of family types and their different needs; respecting the autonomy of the family and the individuality of each of its members; protecting children's rights in the family and society, and making their quality of life a priority; ensuring equality of the sexes; providing various services and enabling families to choose from among them; securing contributions from society for childcare; providing for the additional safety of families living in specific circumstances; and on a comprehensive and integrated approach.

Policy on women
In Slovenia, women make up almost a half of the work force and usually work full-time, like men. Despite the fact that women are on average better qualified than men, it is more difficult for them to find work, they register as sole traders less often, are in more junior positions, often have lower career prospects than men, and are not paid as much with regard to their qualifications. Legal protection from employment discrimination is exemplary; however, it needs to be implemented.

With regard to the percentage of the total population women are not appropriately represented at all political levels, despite having the same political rights as men. In the National Assembly, women currently comprise only 12 per cent of MPs.

Pension system reform
Until 2000, Slovenia had one of the lowest retirement ages in Europe (56 years and 6 months). Since January 2000, a higher retirement age has been gradually introduced, which should contribute towards extending active status. The new retirement age for men is 63 and for women 61. Pensioners accounted for 26.5% of the country’s population in 2005, 0.3 percentage points more than in 2004. The new Pension and Disability Insurance Act introduced a number of special circumstances under which it is possible to retire before the retirement age (e.g. because of children, or employment before the age of 18) and one new pension scheme has been created – a state pension.


This page:




Help/FAQ | Terms | Imprint
Home People Pictures Videos Sites Blogs Chat
Top
.