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Japan Currency

ISO 4217 code
JPY
Central bank
Bank of Japan
 Website
www.boj.or.jp
User(s)
Japan
Zimbabwe[1]
Inflation
0.1%
 Source
The World Factbook,
2012 est.
Subunit
 1/100
sen
 1/1000
rin
Symbol
¥ (international)
円 (Japan—present
day)
圓 (Japan—traditional)
Plural
The language(s) of
this currency does not
have a morphological
plural distinction.
Coins
¥1, ¥5, ¥10, ¥50,
¥100, ¥500
Banknotes
¥1000, ¥2000, ¥5000,
¥10,000
Printer
National Printing
Bureau
 Website
www.npb.go.jp
Mint
Japan Mint
 Website
www.mint.go.jp
The Japanese yen (円
or 圓 en?, symbol: ¥;
code: JPY) is the official
currency of Japan. It is
the third most traded
currency in the foreign
exchange market
after the United States
dollar and the euro.[2] It
is also widely used as a
reserve currency after
the U.S. dollar, the euro,
and the pound sterling.
Pronunciation and
etymology
Yen is pronounced "en"
[eɴ] in Japanese. The
word (Shinjitai: 円,
Kyūjitai: 圓) literally
means "round" in
Japanese, as yuán does
in Chinese or won in
Korean. Originally,
Chinese had traded
silver in mass (see
sycee) and when
Spanish and Mexican
silver coins
arrived, the Chinese
called them 銀圓 (silver
round) for their circular
shapes.[3] The coins
and the name also
appeared in Japan.
Later, the Chinese
replaced 圓 with 元[4][5]
which has the same
pronunciation in
Mandarin (but not in
Japanese). The
Japanese preferred 圓
which remains until now
(albeit in its simplified
form, 円, since the end
of World War II).
The spelling and
pronunciation "yen" is
standard in English. This
is because mainly
English speakers who
visited Japan at the end
of the Edo period to the
early Meiji period spelled
words this way. ゑん/
wen/ in historical kana
orthography
. In the 16th century,
Japanese /e/(え) and /
we/(ゑ) both had been
pronounced [je] and
Portuguese
missionaries had spelled
them "ye".[6] Some
time thereafter, by the
middle of the 18th
century, /e/ and /we/
came to be pronounced
[e] as in modern
Japanese, although
some regions retain the
[je] pronunciation.
Walter Henry Medhurst,
who had not come to
Japan and met any
Japanese, having
consulted mainly a
Japanese-Dutch
dictionary, spelled some
"e"s as "ye" in his An
English and Japanese,
and Japanese and
English Vocabulary
(1830).[7] In the early
Meiji era, James Curtis
Hepburn, following
Medhurst, spelled all
"e"s as "ye" in his A
Japanese and English
dictionary (1st ed.[8]
1867). That was the
first full-scale
Japanese-English/
English-Japanese
dictionary, which had a
strong influence on
Westerners in Japan
and probably prompted
the spelling "yen".
Hepburn revised most
of "ye"s to "e" in the 3rd
edition (1886)[9] in
order to mirror the
contemporary
pronunciation, except
"yen".[10] This was
probably already fixed
and has remained so
ever since.


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