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ENDANGERED FACTS

Facts About Endangered Species

According to scientists, more than one and one-half million species exist on the earth today. However, recent estimates state that at least 20 times that many species inhabit the planet.

In the United States, 735 species of plants and 496 species of animals are listed as threatened or endangered.

266 of these listed species have recovery plans currently under development.

There are more than 1,000 animal species endangered worldwide.

There are more than 3,500 protected areas in existence worldwide. These areas include parks, wildlife refuges and other reserves. They cover a total of nearly 2 million square miles (5 million square km), or 3% of our total land area.

Aquatic species, which are often overlooked, are facing serious trouble. One third of the United States’ fish species, two-thirds of its crayfish species, and almost three-quarters of its mussel species are in trouble.

Elephants

African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)
The african elephant is classified as a member of the order Proboscidea (Elephants) and is a member of the family Elephantidae. The male stands up to ten feet high to its shoulder, and weighs up to six tons. The female is slightly smaller, and weighs up to four tons. It is classified as an endangered species due to a reduction of at least 50% of the african elephant population over the last three generations based on an index of abundance. Hunting of the african elephant is now banned in several countries, but poaching for ivory still exists.

Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus)
The asian elephant is classified as a member of the order Proboscidea (Elephants) and is a member of the family Elephantidae. It stands up to ten feet high and twenty feet long. It weighs up to 10,000 pounds. The asian elephant is classified as an endangered species due to a reduction of at least 50% of the asian elephant population over the last three generations based on an index of abundance and a decline in area of occupancy. The Asian elephant has four subspecies: the Indian, Ceylon, Sumatran, and Malaysian elephants.

Whales

Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
The right whale is classified as a member of the order Cetacea (Whales) and is a member of the family Balaenidae. It grows up to sixty feet long, and is twelve to eighteen feet long at birth. It weighs up to sixty tons as an adult. The right whale is classified as an endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 250 mature right whales and an estimated continuing decline of at least 20% within two generations. The right whale was once the most hunted of all whales, and is now protected by law.


Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
The blue whale is classified as a member of the order Cetacea (Whales) and is a member of the family Balaenopteridae. The male blue whale grows to about eighty-two feet long, and the female grows to about eighty-five feet long. It weighs up to 285,000 pounds as an adult. The blue whale is classified as an endangered species due to a reduction of at least 50% of the blue whale population over the last three generations based on direct observation, an index of abundance, and actual levels of exploitation. The blue whale is the largest mammal to have lived on the earth, but it feeds on some of the smallest marine organisms: plankton.


Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus)
The fin whale is classified as a member of the order Cetacea (Whales) and is a member of the family Balaenopteridae. It grows up to eighty feet long. The fin whale is classified as an endangered species due to a reduction of at least 50% of the blue whale population over the last three generations based on direct observation, an index of abundance, and actual levels of exploitation.


Primates

Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia)
The golden lion tamarin is classified as a member of the order Primates and is a member of the family Callitrichidae. The golden lion tamarin's head and body are about one foot long, and the tail is slightly shorter. It weighs about one and a half pounds. The golden lion tamarin is classified as a critically endangered species due to the fact that it only exists in severely fragmented subpopulations consisting of no more than fifty mature tamarins each, and that there has been continuing decline in the golden lion tamarin population. The golden lion tamarin is one of the most endangered of all mammals.

Hybrid Spider Monkey (Ateles belzebuth hybridus)
The hybrid spider monkey is classified as a member of the order Primates and is a member of the family Cebidae. The hybrid spider monkey grows to almost two feet long, not including the tail. It weighs from ten to fifteen pounds. The hybrid spider monkey is classified as an endangered species due to the fact that it only exists in severely fragmented subpopulations, and that there has been continuing decline in the hybrid spider monkey population. The hybrid spider monkey is known for its ability to use its tail as an extra limb.


Aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
The aye-aye is classified as a member of the order Primates and is a member of the family Daubentoniidae. The aye-aye is about the size of a rabbit, and is brown. It is a nocturnal animal. The aye-aye is classified as an endangered species due to a projected reduction of at least 50% of the aye-aye population over the next ten years based on levels of exploitation and a decline in area of occupancy. Also, the aye-aye has an estimated population of less than 2500 and an observed continuing decline in the form of severly fragmented subpopulations. The aye-aye builds nests out of twigs to hide during the day. It can be found on the African island of Madagascar.


Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla)
The gorilla is classified as a member of the order Primates and is a member of the family Hominidae. The male gorilla grows to about six feet high, and weighs up to six hundred pounds. The female gorilla grows to about five feet high, and weighs up to two hundred pounds. The gorilla is classified as an endangered species due to the projected gorilla population declining to at the highest 50% due to a decline in area of occupancy. The gorilla is the largest and most powerful primate alive, but is a peaceful and sociable animal.

Carnivores

Red Wolf (Canis rufus)
The red wolf is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Canidae. The red wolf is classified as a critically endangered species due to the estmation that its population consists of less than fifty mature red wolves.

Amur Leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis)
The amur leopard is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as a critically endangered species due to a reduction of at least 80% of its population over the past three generations because of a decline in area of occupancy, extent of occurance, or quality of habitat. The amur leopard population is also estimated to be less than 50 mature individuals. Amur leopards can be found in eastern Asia.

Anatolian Leopard (Panthera pardus tulliana)
The anatolian leopard is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as a critically endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 250 mature individuals and a continuing decline in numbers of mature individuals and population structure in the form of severely fragmented populations. Anatolian leopards can be found in Turkey.

Asiatic Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus)
The Asiatic cheetah is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as a critically endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 50 mature individuals and a continuing decline in numbers of mature individuals and population structure due to the fact that all Asiatic cheetahs are in a single population. Asiatic cheetahs can be found in Iran.

Florida Cougar (Puma concolor coryi)
The Florida cougar is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is also known as the Florida panther and the Florida Puma. It is classified as a critically endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 50 mature individuals. Florida cougars can be found in the United States.

Iberian Lynx (Lynx Pardinus)
The iberian lynx is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as an endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 2500 mature individuals and an extimated continuing decline of at least 20% of its population within two generations. Iberian lynx can be found in Portugal and Spain.

Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia)
The snow leopard is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as an endangered species due to an estimated population of no more than 2500 snow leopards and the fact that it has no subpopulation numbering more than 250 mature leopards. Snow leopards can be found in eastern Asia

Texas Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis albescens)
The Texas ocelot is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. It is classified as an endangered species due to an estimated population of less than 250 mature individuals. The Texas ocelot can be found in Mexico and the United States.

Tiger (Panthera tigris)
The tiger is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Felidae. The male tiger grows up to ten feet long from its head to the tip of its tail, and weighs up to 575 pounds. The tiger is classified as an endangered species due to the projected tiger population declining to at the highest 50% due to an index of abundance and a decline in area of occupancy. The tiger consists of eight subspecies, distinguished by the colour of their coat.

Marine Otter (Lutra felina)
The marine otter is classified as a member of the order Carnivora (Carnivores) and is a member of the family Mustelidae. It is classified as an endangered species due to the marine otter population declining because of the levels of exploitation and a decline in its area of occupancy. Marine otters can be found in South America.

Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
The giant panda is classified as a member of the order ...


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