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★The GiTa

The GREAT philosofy flows from THE GREAT GOD , between two GREAT ARMY , in frunt of the great worrie

"Song of The Blessed Lord"

-considered among the most important texts in the history of literature and philosophy.
- The Bhagavad Gita comprises roughly 700 verses, and is a part of the Mahabharata.

-The content of the Gita is the conversation between Krishna and Arjuna taking place on the battlefield before the start of the Kurukshetra war.
-Responding to Arjuna's confusion and moral dilemma about fighting his own cousins who had taken the side of evil, Krishna explains to Arjuna his duties as a warrior and prince .

-The Bhagavad Gita occurs in the Bhishma Parva of the Mahabharata and comprises 18chapters from the 25th through 42nd and consists of 700 verses.
-Its authorship is traditionally ascribed to Vyasa, the compiler of the Mahabharata.
-The verses themselves, using the range and style of Sanskrit meter with similes and metaphors, are written in
a poetic form that is traditionally chanted.

Within the text of the Bhagavad Gītā itself, Krishna states that
the knowledge of Yoga contained in the Gītā was first instructed to mankind at the very beginning of their existence.

-Swami Vivekananda dismisses concerns about differences of opinion regarding the historical events as unimportant for study of the Gita from the point of acquirement of Dharma.




A manuscript illustration of the Battle of Kurukshetra, fought between the Kauravas and the Pandavas, recorded in the Mahābhārata.

The Mahabharata centers on the exploits of the Pandavasand the Kauravas, two families of royal cousins descended from two brothers, Pandu and Dhritarashtra, respectively. Because Dhritarashtra was born blind, Pandu inherited the ancestral kingdom, comprising a part of northern India around modern Delhi. The Pandava brothers were Yudhishthira the eldest, Bhima, Arjuna, Nakula, and Sahadeva. The Kaurava brothers were one hundred in number, Duryodhana being the eldest. When Pandu died at an early age, his young children were placed under the care of their uncle Dhritarashtra who usurped the throne.

The Pandavas and the Kauravas were brought up together in the same household and had the same teachers, the most notable of whom were Bhishmaand Dronacharya.
- The Pandavas were endowed with righteousness, self-control, nobility, and many other knightly traits.
- On the other hand, the hundred sons of Dhritarashtra, especially Duryodhana, were endowed with negative qualities and were cruel, unrighteous, unscrupulous, greedy, and lustful. Duryodhana, jealous of his five cousins, contrived various means to destroy them.



War became inevitable. Both Duryodhana and Arjuna requested Krishna to support them in the war, since he possessed the strongest army, and was revered as the wisest teacher and the greatest yogi. Krishna offered to give his vast army to one of them and to become a charioteer and counselor for the other, but he would not touch any weapon nor participate in the battle in any manner.
-While Duryodhana chose Krishna's vast army, Arjuna preferred to have Krishna as his charioteer.
- The Gita opens with the question of the blind king to Sanjaya regarding what happened on the battlefield when the two armies faced each other in battle array.





-The Bhagavad Gita begins before the start of the climactic battle at Kurukshetra, with the Pandava prince Arjuna becoming filled with doubt on the battlefield. Realizing that his enemies are his own relatives, beloved friends, and revered teachers, he turns to his charioteer and guide, Krishna, for advice.
In summary the main philosophical subject matter of the Bhagavad Gita is the explanation of five basic concepts or "truths":

-
Krishna counsels Arjuna on the greater idea of dharma, or universal harmony and duty. He begins with the tenet that the soul (Atman) is eternal and immortal. Any 'death' on the battlefield would involve only the shedding of the body, whereas the soul is permanent. Arjuna's hesitation stems from a lack of right understanding of the 'nature of things,' the privileging of the unreal over the real. His fear and hesitance become impediments to the proper balancing of the universal dharmic order.
In order to clarify his point, Krishna expounds the various Yoga processes and understanding of the true nature of the universe. Krishna describes the yogic paths of devotional service,
-Fundamentally, the Bhagavad Gita proposes that true enlightenment comes from growing beyond identification with the temporal ego, the 'False Self', the ephemeral world, so that one identifies with the truth of the immortal self, the absolute soul or Atman. Through detachment from the material sense of ego, the Yogi, or follower of a particular path of Yoga, is able to transcend his/her illusory mortality and attachment to the material world and enter the realm of the Supreme.

Krishna does not propose that the physical world must be forgotten or neglected. Rather, one's life on Earth must be lived in accordance with greater laws and truths, one must embrace one's temporal duties whilst remaining mindful of timeless reality, acting for the sake of service without consideration for the results thereof. Such a life would naturally lead towards stability, happiness and, ultimately, enlightenment.

-To demonstrate his divine nature, Krishna grants Arjuna the boon of cosmic vision and allows the prince to see his 'Universal Form'.

Mahatma Gandhi, in his commentary on the Gita, -interpreted the battle as "an allegory in which the battlefield is the soul and Arjuna, man's higher impulses struggling against evil."

-Swami Vivekananda also said that the first discourse in the Gita related to war can be taken allegorically.

" ...That is a view which the general character and the actual language of the epic does not justify and, if pressed, would turn the straightforward philosophical language of the Gita into a constant, laborious and somewhat puerile mystification....the Gita is written in plain terms and professes to solve the great ethical and spiritual difficulties which the life of man raises, and it will not do to go behind this plain language and thought and wrest them to the service of our fancy. But there is this much of truth in the view, that the setting of the doctrine though not symbolical, is certainly typical...
"


************************
Dr.Nilesh.G.Patel
student of final M.B.B.S


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