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History of Diwali

The history of Diwali is originated from various Hindu religious scriptures, mainly the Puranas. Like in many parts of Nepal and India, the myth behind the celebration of Diwali is the victory of Rama over Ravana and then the return of Rama in Ayodhya with Lakshman and Sita after their 14 year exile in forest. Legend says, the people of Ayodhya greeted Rama by lighting rows of lamps.

Thus it was named as Deepawali, deep (lamp) avali (rows). Tracing back to the history of ancient India, Diwali was celebrated as the main harvest festival. But later it is being celebrated following the Hindu treatise. As per the Hindu almanac or Panjika, Diwali is celebrated on Amavasya, the 15th day of the dark fortnight of the Hindu month of Ashwin, i.e. October or November every year. But the main Diwali festival is a five day long ritual commences with Dhanwantari Triodasi or Dhan Theras. Second day of Diwali is referred as Aswayuja Bahula Chaturdasi or Naraka Chaturdasi.

Third day is Amavasya or the main Diwali. Worship of Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth, is performed as according to the Hindu mythology Lakshmi was incarnated on this day, the new moon day of the Kartik month. Fourth day is known as Kartika Shudda Padyami or Bali Padyami. It is believed that Bali would come out on this day from Pathala Loka to rule Bhuloka as such a boon was given by Lord Vishnu. The fifth or last day of Diwali is known as Yama Dvitiya or Bhai Dooj or Bhratri Dooj. This day is marked for the celebration of sister-brother relationship.


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